Suggestions?

Chase and the Iron Lion have your disc golf needs covered.

Moderator: Chase20460

Postby KePP » Mon Feb 04, 2008 12:30 pm

Something else that can help a lot is watching pros. There are some DVD threads on here to get an idea of what to get. The MSDGC (Marshall Street) videos are always solid. Sprague won in 06... if you plan to do lessons with him, maybe that'd be one to get.
User avatar
KePP
 
Posts: 1847
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Beaverdale

Postby swan » Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:33 pm

KePP wrote:The putter is money for developing your game because it doesn't mask your errors and its also your scoring club.

An indirect answer to your question: use the slowest disc that will reach your target. The faster something is moving, the harder it is to stop with its larger margin of error. Drivers go fast, putters go slow. Once you fall in love with your putter, you will start noticing that even your bad approaches are leaving you with putts. Then you'll notice others using something like a buzzz and watch it land near the pin and then skip 25' away with all the energy it still has. You'll say to yourself I'm glad I understand physics.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Using the slowest disc makes a lot of sense. You have to leave yourself a make-able put coming back. Something that will nestle down close.

Is this where the spike hyser comes in? Not exactly sure what it is, but... :? Is this the shot you throw (RHBH) way high to the right and let it come down on the target really hard? Likely a short distance shot, but is it primarily used for approaches? What is the best distance for this shot. Also which discs are "designed" best for these?
swan
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:38 pm
Location: moline

Postby swan » Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:40 pm

Chase20460 wrote:
swan wrote:
Today's newbie inquiry... Putter distance. What is the popular concensus on how far out you decide to use your putter? Obviously conditions will vary, but where do you draw the line between the putter and another, sharper approach disc?



It all depends on comfort and skill level. Putters are pretty easy to throw, but the farther you go out the less the control. For me, if its a calm day and Im 225-250 out, Im looking at my putter, be it off the tee or on a approach. Im pretty comfortable throwing a mid-range or fairway driver if the conditions are crummy. Basically, you start where you can with consistency and learn to go farther back.


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks Chase. You mentioned before you carry a few different putters for different scenarios. What would you recommend for a variety of distances? Your 225-250 putter is ___________ (& weight?) And your scoring putter is _____________ (& weight?). Optimum conditions of course....
Thanks man. I sincerely appreciate the feedback. I'm trying to assemble a good array of discs to work with and putters are something I want covered right away.
swan
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:38 pm
Location: moline

Postby flyinplastic23 » Mon Feb 04, 2008 5:02 pm

try going out and playing a whole round with only your putters and midrange... its a good way to learn the discs. What works for one might not work for another. It also helps you learn where you need to sacrafice distance for control or vice versa. I used to have a hard time with mid to short range but after playing prospect for multiple rounds in this manner, i would now say the short game and Roc are where I lay most of my confidence. I am sure chase has great suggestions with what discs you should try. the only midrange i have in my bag are Rocs at varying stabilities and 2 aviars.

p.s. i just read your comment about the spike hyzer... i used to hyzer in when i just started play because i was afraid to go past the basket, but the problem with this is on fast greens or any.. you have the chance of rolling away... it would really be to your benefit to learn how to go straight to the basket with an upshot/ approach using your putter... takes finesse (sp?) and by far was the most difficult skill for me to master (still working on it) but more often than not I am left with a makeable putt, where my old hyzer upshot would look good in flight but then hit the ground and take off.
Last edited by flyinplastic23 on Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
A person with great dreams can accomplish great things- Bob Rotella

Pionta Guinness, le do thoil
flyinplastic23
 
Posts: 2134
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 11:50 pm
Location: Quad Cities

Postby swan » Mon Feb 04, 2008 5:58 pm

[quote="flyinplastic23"]try going out and playing a whole round with only your putters and midrange... its a good way to learn the discs. quote]

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks for all the input. It's funny you recommended playing without any drivers because that's exactly what I planned on doing. No better way to learn than to force yourself to try different shots. I've never really tried to max out any of my putters before. It will be interesting to see how this works. Good thinking.

Obligatory Ball Golf Reference: A couple years ago when I bought a new set of irons, I pulled the driver out of the bag and played Saukie with nothing but my irons. It was a great way to both get used to the new sticks, but also to practice working the ball in different ways. Bad thing was I really didn't score much differently. Kind of made me wonder about whether the driver actually helped at all. :roll:

Thanks again.
swan
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:38 pm
Location: moline

Postby Chase20460 » Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:43 am

swan wrote:
Chase20460 wrote:
swan wrote:
Today's newbie inquiry... Putter distance. What is the popular concensus on how far out you decide to use your putter? Obviously conditions will vary, but where do you draw the line between the putter and another, sharper approach disc?



It all depends on comfort and skill level. Putters are pretty easy to throw, but the farther you go out the less the control. For me, if its a calm day and Im 225-250 out, Im looking at my putter, be it off the tee or on a approach. Im pretty comfortable throwing a mid-range or fairway driver if the conditions are crummy. Basically, you start where you can with consistency and learn to go farther back.


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks Chase. You mentioned before you carry a few different putters for different scenarios. What would you recommend for a variety of distances? Your 225-250 putter is ___________ (& weight?) And your scoring putter is _____________ (& weight?). Optimum conditions of course....
Thanks man. I sincerely appreciate the feedback. I'm trying to assemble a good array of discs to work with and putters are something I want covered right away.



Well, that depends to be honest with you. I feel like Im to the point where about any putter is going to do the job I want it to..its the Indian not the Arrow, kind of thing.

Depending on mood, and time of the year ( right now Im using like 6 different putters at any time, trying to get a feel for something new.) I may have different options as far as putters go.

Right Now:

Approach: FLX Challenger. Dead straight, very little fall off. Tricky.
Putt: Soft Magnet.
Putt: DX Aviar. ( Old standby. )

Usually:

Approach: Wizard, KC or Big Bead of some sort.
Flippy Approach: Beat to piss DX Aviar. Turns over, period.
Straight Approach: 9x KC Avair
Putt: DX Avair or Star Aviar


The FLX Challenger: is a good disc for approachs. Dead on straight, but can be somewhat finicky and likes to rise in flight. The D plastic version is another favorite of lots of players. It has great grip, but I find them to be fairly untrustworty. The FLX plastic version is growing on me.

The Wizard: Our best selling putter, and by far the most popular in this area. The Wizard is a good aging disc, they beat in very well. Most people tend to stay with the S plastic version ( thier DX ) and sometimes pick up the more exclusive plastics for approachs. These are one of the few putters that are versatile enough to handle all duties. Wizards come in varying forms of stiffness and plastic, everyone is different.

KC Avairs: Are great discs. I use them quite a bit, but the ones I throw are expensive, and not something to really buy now to play with. The newer versions ( the 12x) are seemingly good approach discs, but the stiff plastic makes for trouble close up. KCs provide alot of spit outs and cut throughs. I tend to use them more for approaching than putting. DX Big Bead, Star Driver, JK, all of these are the same mold, just different plastics.

DX Aviar: My all time favorite for putting. I think these are still the best putters on the market, though they arent very durable and dont make for a long time consistent approach. The Star version is the same thing, just in a more dependable plastic. These can make for great approach discs as well, and last way longer than the DX, but can be slippery around the basket and arent exactly headwind strong. Decent though.

Magnet: Im working with these, but it isnt the first time. Ive battled them before and I threw them in the garbage. Think less stable Avair, which is why Im liking it in the winter. In the summer, doubtful, but I am using the Soft version right now. Peoples games change from year to year, so just giving it another chance. It was the way for me with Wizards.


Heres some other tips on putters:

Rhyno: Sucks. Dont waste 2 years on it like everyone else.
Birdie: See above.
Z Putr: See above.
Rattler: See above.
Sonic: See above.
http://www.ironliondgs.com
"I dont come to bow, I come to blow"- Bob Marley

"Im in the Gooooooo!" - Francine Smith
User avatar
Chase20460
 
Posts: 5203
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 9:51 pm
Location: 2630 16th St. Moline IL

Postby irban » Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:27 pm

Love the Rhyno!
~~~- ¥
User avatar
irban
 
Posts: 5238
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 10:31 am
Location: A State of Minds. (the idiot who thought this was clever is back, did you notice?)

Postby AO » Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:35 pm

IMO all aspects of the game need to be practiced. Do your homework from the online sites in regards to speed, stability, and wind angles. Then it is just time, making changes in mistakes, and lots of repetition. I prefer going to a big park and throwing different shots at targets. It does get a bit boring but if you definately get more throws in during this time. Playing rounds is more fun but takes longer. If you can get a mix of throwing in a field and playing courses you will learn quickly. In regards to technique, get a a few lessons from Sprague so you start off learning good form and then practice that. That is something that I wish I had. I taught myself everything but I think with some advice I would have made some changes and improvements sooner.
AO
 
Posts: 4315
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 11:06 pm
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA

Postby KePP » Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:39 pm

Last year I finally got the rhyno out of the bag. I traded them to some amateur named Pete. Whattup, cuz.

Good post, Chase.
User avatar
KePP
 
Posts: 1847
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Beaverdale

Postby AO » Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:43 pm

Heres some other tips on putters:

Rhyno: Sucks. Dont waste 2 years on it like everyone else.
Birdie: See above.
Z Putr: See above.
Rattler: See above.
Sonic: See above.[/quote]

Probably have to agree with all that except the Ryno is ok in the circle. But for throwing, they are junk. The Banger is also a waste of time.

Most popular putters that I see on the course.
Gateway- Wizard/Warlock
Discraft-Magnet/Challenger/APX

Innova-Aviar. They have tons of molds/runs and I don't throw them. Prob have to talk to Chase or Sprague about that.
AO
 
Posts: 4315
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 11:06 pm
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA

Postby swan » Tue Feb 05, 2008 3:13 pm

Great posts. Thanks guys. Exactly what I was looking for. The disc-by-disc rundown is very helpful. After IDing the candidates now it's just a matter of throwing them around to see what works best.

Adam - Thanks for the advice. I am really going to concentrate on learning and practicing correctly. Sounds cheesy, I know (cue the Rocky theme). Lessons are very underrated. If I can find someone who is better than I am to take a look at my game, it would definitely speed up my learning curve. Which is good.

Thanks again.
swan
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:38 pm
Location: moline

Postby irban » Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:14 pm

The Rhyno doesn't anhyzer all that well, but other than that, I throw it from 150 or so in. It doesn't hyzer out too far, it doesn't flip and it stops on a dime. Plus it holds up well in the wind. I putt with it exclusively too, but I've always preferred a stable putter. For several years I used Omega AP, then tried wizards for a while before I settled on the Rhyno.
~~~- ¥
User avatar
irban
 
Posts: 5238
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 10:31 am
Location: A State of Minds. (the idiot who thought this was clever is back, did you notice?)

Postby flyinplastic23 » Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:55 pm

I took a few lessons from sprague. That really helped. He is great one on one, will make you tapes and is just a good teacher. We played a lot of catch, working on different ways to get to the basket... he always brings some extra discs so you dont have to go chasing it. I really second AO's advice. He'll teach you angles, and release, great for form ( i got lots of complements on my form at worlds after my lessons).

Everything the boys said about discs are true, but even more true is to take time to truly learn the discs. 2 weeks, 2 rounds with a disc doesnt count. get at least 3 of the same molds so you can get lots of reps in. I have only used 2 different molds of putters but i probably have 5-10 of each of them so i can really learn the disc and how they break in. P.s. pick something that feels good in your hand... not just cause everyone else throws it makes it the right disc for you. For a while I liked Challengers... then i switched to 11x KC aviars... both felt great in my hand.... I just like how the Aviars float to the basket and stay really straight "for me". I dont like other putters now because i dont know their flight like i know my aviars, but that doesnt make other putters bad.

Tank has some really good advice for learning to throw your putter, its somewhere on here. He has a whole practice routine.. i bet one of the guys can find it for you.
A person with great dreams can accomplish great things- Bob Rotella

Pionta Guinness, le do thoil
flyinplastic23
 
Posts: 2134
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 11:50 pm
Location: Quad Cities

Postby KePP » Tue Feb 05, 2008 8:44 pm

swan wrote:I am really going to concentrate on learning and practicing correctly. Sounds cheesy, I know

Sounds smart. The phrase goes: "Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." Incorrect practice only reinforces bad habits.

Here's TanK's tips that Kelly alluded to. He's a pro from Omaha. Although I just looked him up on PDGA (Ken Franks) and it says Sunset Beach, CA. He used to post on here somewhat regularly, but haven't seen him on since last year. Ken Franks - Team Innova

http://nebdiscforums.yuku.com/forums/10 ... -Tips.html
User avatar
KePP
 
Posts: 1847
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Beaverdale

Postby flyinplastic23 » Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:49 pm

yeah he moved out to cali for the winter, not sure if he will be back or not, his computer access is not as regular as it used to be, He did want me to pass on that he is doing well!
A person with great dreams can accomplish great things- Bob Rotella

Pionta Guinness, le do thoil
flyinplastic23
 
Posts: 2134
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 11:50 pm
Location: Quad Cities

PreviousNext

Return to Iron Lion Disc Golf Supply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest