Suggestions?

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Suggestions?

Postby swan » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:20 am

I'm pretty new to the game and am in need of some helpful advice. I've played a dozen or so rounds in the past two years and I've decided to give it a more serious go this year.

I'm doing a lot of research trying to decide what to put in my bag. Most manfacturers sites have pretty biased explanations on which disc does what, etc, so I was hoping to get some input from anyone to help me answer some questions I have:

1) Putter weight - Is there a decided agreement on whether it's best to use a heavier putter? Seems to me a 150-165 could ricochet off the basket easier than a heavier disc. Any truth to this?

2) Over/Understable - My biggest problem with longer shots is that the disc tends to take a huge dive left before it starts to glide. Likely a fundamental issue with my throwing angle, but should I (as a beginner) be buying every understable disc I can find?

3) Too much, too soon? - Should I try to incorporate a disc for evey shot right now or should I just try to work with what I have?

4) DX>Champion>Star - Does anyone really play a DX? They're more affordable, but how long do they really last? I've chunked up a couple just by hitting the fence in my backyard while putting. Star all the way or what?

5) Little help? - Is there anyone in the area who will give lessons? I would appreciate a playing lesson where someone could give me a nice critique on a course? You can usually find me in the bowl behind Moline High School chucking my DX bundle-babies.

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies. I am seriously committed to getting better and I look forward to meeting more players in the area. I live about a mile from Prospect (about 1000 ft from the IL) and if anyone is ever up for a round at Prospect or anywhere else, please let me know. --Andy Swan
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Postby cmlasley » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:11 pm

http://www.discgolfreview.com/

http://www.discgolfreview.com/forums/

The website in the above links contains a treasure trove of information regarding discs, plastics, weights, and technique. Use it. Love it.

What discs are you throwing now? How far are you throwing? I take it you are throwing right handed back hand? If you can answer these questions, we'll be better able to help you.

When I get friends into the sport, I try to push them in the direction of versatile, slower discs in DX. I think the best beginner discs are DX Gazelles and D Cyclones. When new, they start a little overstable, and when they start to wear a little bit, they are really straight and consistent. The more understable discs will be better in the short term, but I think you learn to keep the nose down and to snap better with more overstable discs.
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Postby swan » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:27 pm

Yes, RHBH.

Right now, I've been throwing a DX Beast, Champ Valk (150), DX Shark, DX Leopard, Champ Aviar, DX Wolf, Champ Panther. Recently, picked up a Star SL.

Maxing about 275-300 fairly consistently.

What makes a disc slower?
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Postby Lou Siffer » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:28 pm

Hey Andy, welcome to the world of disc golf!

You've got a lot of good questions there that aren't easy to answer definitively. Although I'm sure folks who know more than I do will take a crack at them.

One of the best ways to learn technique, have questions answered, and improve your game is to play with others who've got some experience.

(insert shameless promotion here) This Sunday the 3rd, the Quad City Disc Golf Club (QCDGC website) will be holding the annual Ice Bowl tournament at Devils Glen Park with registration beginning at around 10:30AM.

Ice Bowls are actually a series of tournaments that are held around the country this time of year to raise money and food for that areas local food bank or charity.

Check out the club's website (and here) for information on club sponsored events, volunteer opportunities, and especially our beginner friendly handicap league. All of these will give you an opportunity to meet like minded people, and help you improve your game.

See you on the links.

Lou (AKA John)
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Postby Lou Siffer » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:33 pm

One more thing, with the Iron Lion being so close to your house, don't hesitate to go in there and talk to Chase. He's a virtual treasure chest of information. :D
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Postby swan » Mon Jan 28, 2008 2:25 pm

Thanks John. Not likely to be playing in any tourneys for a while. I'd rather get a handle on some fundamentals first. I played a handful of rounds at Prospect last year and decided I should work on some things before I get back out.

I've played ball golf for most of my life and I know the best way to get better is to play with superior players. There's nothing like getting an education in the game while getting stomped in a skins game. I'd love to get out with some experienced players.

It's very cool to see the grassroots efforts to expand the game in this area. I've poked around various forums and websites and it looks like the Quads have a strong foundation in the sport. Kudos to all who put in the work at Camden II. Can't wait to see it.

Please keep the advice coming. I'm really looking forward to improving my game this year and becoming part of a great sport in a great market.
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Postby cmlasley » Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:01 pm

swan wrote:What makes a disc slower?


The profile of the wing as compared to its width. Generally speaking, the wider-rimmed drivers are faster.

Older drivers, such as the Gazelle, Cyclone, Sabre, Leopard, etc, which are now considered to be fairway drivers, are slower than the newer discs like your Star SL. These older drivers are more forgiving of slight imperfections in form because they are less nose-angle sensitive. Because they are slower, they also don't need as much speed to fly a complete flight pattern, and so you can throw them in a more controlled manner and still get good distance.

Since you are throwing 275-300', it sounds like you have a good start. What discs are you getting to go that far? If you can get the Leopard out there in that neighborhood and pretty straight, I would keep throwing that for all but headwinds until it starts turning right, then replace it with something like a Cyclone or Gazelle. Your champ Panther may work for headwinds, too, but it is slower than the Leopard even, and will get pretty flippy as it beats in.

As far as putter weights, it's really a matter of preference. I like to throw a heavy one for short putts and a slightly lighter one for long putts. When I drive with a putter, I like them heavy. My putter of choice is a Wizard.

I agree with the above about picking Chase's brain. He doesn't mind talking discs and he knows more about them then I do.
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Postby swan » Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:16 pm

OK, thanks for the info Morgan. Much appreciated.

I have to apologize for using the Iron Lion thread for my meager requests. Last thing I want to do is mislead anyone or clog up traffic to the store. My intentions were to reach out for some advice and suggestions on disc purchases. I should've chosen a thread better suited for useless verbal meandering on my part.
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Postby Chase20460 » Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:01 am

swan wrote:OK, thanks for the info Morgan. Much appreciated.

I have to apologize for using the Iron Lion thread for my meager requests. Last thing I want to do is mislead anyone or clog up traffic to the store. My intentions were to reach out for some advice and suggestions on disc purchases. I should've chosen a thread better suited for useless verbal meandering on my part.



STOP RIGHT THERE.


This thread, in fact our business, is here for this reason. What Morgan is saying is pretty much dead on, so you are on the right track. Im glad people are jumping on here to offer assistance, as thats what we are all about.

One of the easiest traps to fall for when getting into disc golf, is the amount of discs out there and the feelings that you should or NEED to have them all. You dont.

Pick the discs your comfortable with and learn the hell out of them. Dont worry about what players at a higher level of skill than yours are throwing. Just because its in a magazine add doesnt mean its meant for everyone.

Putters, Mids, Drivers, all come in different weights and appeal to people for various reasons. Generally, The lighter the disc the easier its going to be to throw and make "S" distance shots. There is good and bad about weight classes, the bad on light discs being that they are at the mercy of the elements. I personally suggest people start in the high 160s to low 170s, and work out the difference for themselves, on drivers. For Mid-ranges, I tend to try for them to go a little heavier, as mids can go up to 182g. Mid-ranges are about controlled shots, which is why most are larger in diameter than drivers, but the long and short is that they are for control. A heavier disc is going to be a little more predictable and easier to control, not to mention more dependable in the wind. This relates to ALL discs, not just midranges and drivers, but putters also. A heavier putter is going to be a little more dependable for approach shots, and into the wind. Putters being more deep dished have a little more trouble in the wind, as the wind gets under and picks them up and flips them over. Myself, I have multiple putters for different situations, some I use entirely for putting, others for approach shots.

I could go on for hours, and usaully do, but am kinda tired. Feel free to ask any questions youd like or to visit the shop whenever. I live right next door, so if it says Closed, just knock on the back door. If Im there, Ill let you in whenever. Its no problem at all. :P
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Postby swan » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:29 am

Great, thanks Chase. I happened to notice this was a sponsored thread when I logged back on yesterday and I didn't know if I should be soliciting advice in the same location people are conducting business. I appreciate your candor and willingness to help.

I'll probably be dropping by to pick up a few putters to work with. I'd like to learn gradually and if I can get a decent putting stroke going everything else can come on it's own. I'm trying to emphasize learning correctly instead of learning quickly. It's fun bust out the big stuff and go yard, but the game gets frustrating if you can't score around the basket.

Thanks again for the tips. Judging from what I've learned so far from my current line-up, it appears I need more gramage in my discs. I've been practicing with a 166 Champ Aviar and a 150 DX Aviar on flat ground. Neither one seems to zero in very well and I have trouble with my release point because they're so light. Maybe something heavier will allow me to just throw instead of aiming if that makes sense.
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Postby GDL17921 » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:37 am

swan wrote:It's fun bust out the big stuff and go yard, but the game gets frustrating if you can't score around the basket.


Wise words from a ball golfer. Knowing this will propel you ahead of recreational players faster than you know.
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Postby KePP » Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:47 pm

Swan, sounds like you're definitely on the right track. Like GDL said, your understanding of the game of golf will greatly accelerate the learning process, along with your desire for knowledge. From there, its just a matter of practicing and playing with people who know what they're doing. You'll get contradicting advice from 50 different people, because everyone is different. You just have to digest the information, identify the fundamental concepts in common, and try techniques on your own to find out what works for you. If you're anything like me, your throw will evolve every single year. And not always for the better.

I also suggest learning both backhand and forehand (sidearm) right from the start. Its easy to take on the mentality of "first I'll just get the backhand down"... then eventually you learn how to make your backhand go both left and right... then you want more distance... then all of a sudden having to take three steps back in your progress to learn the sidearm doesn't sound so great. Just learn it from the beginning, it IS a necessary shot.

When I first got into actually learning how to play, I found Stokely's book to have some pieces of advice that stuck with me on the course. I also got one of his videos which put me to sleep and I don't recommend, but the book was a quick and easy read with good tips.

Lastly, 10 - 40 feet is a good putting range to practice. If you're within 10 meters (approx. 33') of the basket, you cannot follow-thru past the marker or its a "falling putt" penalty.
Last edited by KePP on Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby swan » Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:29 pm

Hey Kepp. I know what you mean about finding the common fundamental concepts of advice from a bunch of people. I really appreciate advice from others (in life or on the course), but finding a way to make it fit your needs is really the biggest learning process. I know I have a lot to work on and I appreciate any tips from experienced players.

Thanks for the heads up on the forearm shots. I can get those off pretty well after trying a few different grips, but I have a problem with distance. For me it's not really a good accuracy shot yet; more for just wide open distance.

So does anyone around town give lessons? I know my other golf game came into form when I had someone to watch me swing and critique my strategy on the course. Practice is one thing, playing is another. It's nice to have another set of eyes in both settings. Are there any players around here who do this sort of thing?
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Postby KePP » Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:37 pm

Chris Sprague gives lessons. He lives in Rock Island.
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Postby KePP » Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:40 pm

Also, if you want to watch some great local footage, including Sprague, go to:

www.discgolftv.com

and search (upper-right) for "river cities rumble"

Choose Final 9 part 1 and part 2.
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