learning to disc off the net

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learning to disc off the net

Postby dkent130 » Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:08 am

As of lately I have come to a realization, without the internet I would still be shooting 10 over + per round. Although I have talented disc golfing friends, when I first started a good majority of them didn't even play tournaments. Disc golf was a social occasion that was cheap and an easy way outta the house. I have never had a pro level player just be like," Hey lets go shoot a round!" As much as that would make my day in a perfect world it just doesn't happen. To lower my scores and improve my game i have relied on you tube, dgplanettv, discraft and innova sites to find my game. Lots of people on this site talk about little things here and there to improve their game but never break it down in a sequence to better their game. Im sure that a ton of golfers have looked into the videos, tips and whatever else but for those who haven't, heres some food for thought. There is no perfect form. If there was, everones throws would look the same and be boring. Imagination of shots, diff lines, and diff disc selection make the game in my opinion. Dave dunipace has one of the best brakedowns of the disc golf throw that i can find though and i hope someone who hasn't looked into it stumbles across this.

1. Light quick footing
2. Plant foot at about 90 degrees with slightly bent knee
3. Hips opening up first
4. Shoulder turn next and fast (both hands tight to body)
5. Elbow extension following (not concurrent with shoulder turn)
6. Wrist stop
7. Powerful wrist position
8. Powerful grip especially after pivot at rip point
9. Disc held high through throw
10. Wrist down and disc in plane with throw


Ejection and Pull Through Side (where heavy disc springs and rips from grip)

Things to look for:

1. Weight over plant foot and still in front of disc
2. Pull through with full force of shoulders and arm (maximum power exerted at this point, not before)
3. Pull through ending up at least 180 degrees from the target.
4. Plane of arm matches plane of disc
5. Pivot on front foot (ball or heel, but ball is better)



VII. Mental


The most important element in learning is imagining that you can do it.

The next most important element is relaxing all your muscles that aren't throwing.

You can't throw the disc with your brain. No matter how much you know about technique, you have to perform, not recite.

Out of these tips I have summed it up into my own words
1. Get a comfortable grip
2. Stay light on your feet(lead in your boots never gets good results)
3. pull back later then sooner that way you can increase your chance of a successfull "hit" in your throw
4.Starting your forward motion after your run up with your hips insures that your elbow will be bent and right across your chest increasing the chance that you will be able to generate power and spin with minimal effort.
5. Loose and smooth is power. I prefer to keep a loose grip on the disc until its coming across my chest then add pressure according to the distance im trying to "fling the disc"
6. Although a power grip will always have optimum distance, a comfortable grip will have consistent distance more often.

Something I rarely see discussed online that should be is how to turn a disc.
I have found a couple things that have helped me that may help someone out there. Weather it is the right way or not it has worked for me.
Originally when i started throwing hyzers and anhyzers I did most of it with my shoulders on the follow through. (rhbh) If I finished with my left shoulder low it would hyzer, left shoulder high it would anny and if i finished pretty flat it would go straight. Since then I have learned that I can do it with my thumb nail as well. May sound goofy until you try it but with a proper downward wrist angle with the disc inline to the plane of your arm, thumbnail to the left produces hyzer, facing up a straight shot and to the right an anhyzer(torquing over). I used to think that throwing a disc flat meant holding it flat. All that does is produce off axis torque because the disc is not in plane with your arm. I played all of the last year as a 100% arm thrower. Until recently I didn't even have a hit in my throw. Needless to say adding 100ft to your drive a day after reading something online really messes with your approach to the game. I would have liked to have the option of having someone far greater in skill help me out when i first started. Im still not the best but i have an understanding for disc golf mechanics and the benefits of playing with people who are better then yourself. Videos can really help you if you are willing to be bored for a bit. Dave Feldberg has an amazing push putt video on vimeo, dan beto on you tube for driving, towel hit drills and right peck drills as most people know is really all you need to develop a hit. Shout out to random dubs at shaver for allowing me to play with some ballers!!! 5 bucks to play with pros and see what makes them better then you is far worth the dollaz.

O and for you sidearmers out there...
1. comfortable grip
2. incorporating a small X step can increase your accuracy
3. the more you turn your left shoulder away from the target the more torque you can gain.
4. Pull back isn't as important as your forward motion, save your power til the last second.
5.Palm to the sky
6. Pretend there is a hammer in your hand and you are hitting a nail into a wall. When you pound the nail in your wrist stops. That is where you get a true tendon bounce and increases spin/distance
7. Shoulders upon follow through sidearm can direct your angles without getting too wristy. Right shoulder down hyzer, right shoulder up anhyzer.
8. Also.... THUMB POSISTION, if you are rolling your wrist into headwinds, throw more stable and realize that on your thumb you have multiple pressure points. Putting more pressure on the inside or outside of your thumb can produce a slightly diff path on the flight plate. The flick shot should really be broken down to your wrist moving 1 inch back and 3 inches forward. When it stops, the disc is ejected off your finger tip propelled by the tendon from your finger down to your wrist. I prefer a sidearm grip in which the disc is ejected off the tip of my middle finger because its the longest finger I got and the tendon attached is the strongest in your hand. Im just an intermediate player with advanced potential so i may not know what im talking about to some, but if this helps at least one person then it was worth the giant @$$ post i just typed up drunken style at midnight! Good shootin fellas
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Postby IHearChains » Mon Oct 03, 2011 9:30 am

O and for you sidearmers out there...

...

8. ... if you are rolling your wrist into headwinds, throw more stable



If somebody is having trouble throwing sidearm with less stable plastic, there may be a problem with technique. Changing discs might put a band-aid on that problem, but is not going to solve it. Maybe that bandaid is good enough, if all you want to use your sidearm for is a right turning meathook. But if you're in the woods and can't get a good backhand stance, you might need a hyzer flip out of your sidearm. Then you will be glad you spent some more time practicing sidearm with less stable plastic.
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Postby robizm » Tue Oct 04, 2011 12:50 am

I remember Scott Stokley @ Jones Park years ago giving tips and one thing he said that always stuck w/me was


"imagine your disc is right above a workbench and your dragging that disc right over that bench all the way until release"


was a really good tip for me at the time throwing both sidearm (which he taught me to throw with 1 finger underneath) and forehand


he hit the most amazing 2 that day on the long as well !
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Postby Ferch » Tue Oct 04, 2011 7:18 am

robizm wrote:I remember Scott Stokley @ Jones Park years ago giving tips and one thing he said that always stuck w/me was


"imagine your disc is right above a workbench and your dragging that disc right over that bench all the way until release"


was a really good tip for me at the time throwing both sidearm (which he taught me to throw with 1 finger underneath) and forehand


he hit the most amazing 2 that day on the long as well !


Um.. Sidearm and forehand are the same. Not trying to correct for poking fun, just to keep the newbie up on terms.

I started forehand and I still use it on occasion and I just use the skipping rocks form( bend right knee-drop the hip and shoulder-explode at target). The best way I have ever heard backhand explained was while you are in the your x step and act like you are handing the disc off to someone behind you, then rip forward and snap the towel. Either way you will find what works for you as you gain more practice and experience.
Living for flight. One day at a time.
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Postby medicinal funk » Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:38 am

nice little writeup dan. no thoughts on putting though, i see. i guess that's more of an individual thing
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Postby Ferch » Wed Oct 05, 2011 8:14 am

medicinal funk wrote:nice little writeup dan. no thoughts on putting though, i see. i guess that's more of an individual thing


Putting is an ancient art that is only passed on to the top students, lol.... :lol:
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